Answering the Call
The American Struggle for the Right to Vote

Brian Jenkins
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Brian

I grew up hearing the stories of my uncle’s trip to Selma in 1965 and fifty one years later we traveled back to Alabama to tell his story. But I also saw this as an opportunity to shine the light on voter suppression today in America. Selma directly contributed to the passing of the Voting ...Read more

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