Can Rules Define Morality?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series

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Moral Dilemmas…Can Ethics Help?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
The parents and medical staff caring for a premature baby struggling for life are faced with the decision of whether or not to continue treatment. Philosopher Immanuel Kant, whose ideas have influenced modern medical ethics, would answer such a question by focusing on human dignity and the chance for the…
Does The Mind Shape The World?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Does the Mind Shape the World? examines Immanuel Kant's position that we interpret the world through a priori constructs of the mind, as well as later philosophers' views of how these constructs may vary among languages and cultures.
Is Morality Relative?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Is Morality Relative? discusses whether all morality is culturally determined, or whether some moral values are valid for all cultures. Harman, Wong, and Rachels explore the claims of relativism. The issue of child labor is explored from a relativist point of view.
Does Reason Define the Good?
Kant suggested that reason determines what is moral or immoral. Analyze his famous categorical imperative, which is a set of obligatory moral rules guided by reason. See how Kant's rules go far beyond the Golden Rule. Then uncover the shortcomings of the categorical imperative.
Is Time Real?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Is Time Real? questions whether time is something measured only by clocks and calendars or something that exists as an entity in its own right. The program explores theories of time presented by Aristotle, Augustine and Kant, and contrasts Newton's theories of time with Einstein's theory of relativity.
Is Ethics Based on Virtue?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Is Ethics Based on Virtue? explores Aristotle's and other ancient views of virtue and the good life, as well as contemporary virtue ethics with its focus on emotions, personal relationships, character, and long-term values.
The Price of Empire (Books 2-3)
Continue your study of Augustine's argument toward civic-minded Romans by reviewing his attacks on their morality and their sense of self-regard. Using their own historians as evidence, Augustine teases out the logical and psychological implications of the Romans' quest for domination, which Augustine says is born out of a longing…
Darwin's Dangerous Idea with Daniel Dennet
A single great idea: The Theory of Natural Selection. With it, Charles Darwin shattered existing notions of the natural world by demonstrating how complexity could arise as a result of a blind and mechanistic sorting process, without an "intelligent designer". Now, join Daniel Dennett as he illuminates the radical nature…
Are You Really You?
Close your inquiry into the afterlife by looking at new ways of defining personhood. According to perdurantism, a person is the sum total of an individual's life experiences and cannot be isolated to a particular time and place. Then question the very concept of a person--a move that may rule…
What Is the Best Way to Gain Knowledge?
Put empiricism to the test as the best way to acquire knowledge. Study the ideas of John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume, together with the response of Immanuel Kant, before settling on the most effective route to understanding the world as it is.
Do We Have Free Will?
Part of the Series: Examined Life Series
Do We Have Free Will? asks if our lives are determined, or if we freely choose among alternatives. Ancient philosophers believed us to be free moral beings, but how do we define our options in a world governed by the laws of physics?