Daisies

Criterion Collection/Janus Films
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Comments (3)

Anonymous picture
Brad

This movie is a gift. What a spell!

Jonathan avatar
Jonathan

It is astonishing that Vera Chytilova is a largely little-known director in the U.S. yet DAISIES is a justifiable cornerstone of the Czech New Wave and equal in its remarkable intensity and inventiveness to Agnes Varda’s better-known CLEO FROM 5 to 7. It is as close to an essential film as ...Read more

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Anonymous

Best laugh , best line, "the spoons are so heavy here" and great feminist commentary

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