Debate Jujitsu: Flipping the Warrant
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate

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Fallacies in Your Opponent's Research
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
To be a great debater, you must not only learn to recognize argument fallacies, but you must also learn to combat them during the debate. This first in a two-part lecture series offers insight to help you identify fallacies that stem from flaws in your opponent's research, including the post…
"Even If" Arguments: The Essential Weapon
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Now that you have explored the ways to build and defend a strong case, it's time to move on to varsity-level debate skills, starting with "even if" arguments. By starting with the premise that your opponent is right about everything, you can then explain why you should still win the…
Arguing for the Affirmative
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
The affirmative side of a debate must do three things: stay relevant to the resolution, indict the status quo, and offer a proposal designed to solve the problems you have identified with the status quo. Discover how to meet these obligations and build a winning affirmative argument.
The Structure of Argument
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
The claim, the evidence, and the warrant: these three elements provide the structure of a strong argument. Unpack each of these elements by studying what they are, how they work, and how they come together to produce an argument. Then home in on the warrant, which is often the most…
The Crucible of Cross-Examination
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Once each case is built, it's time for a cross-examination - a chance to interrogate your opponents to better understand their arguments, identify holes in their reasoning, and keep the audience engaged. This first of three lectures explores the history of debate and reflects on the goals of cross-examination.
Conditional Argumentation
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Although they are two separate fields, the art of debate sometimes employs formal logic with great success. In this lecture, see how "conditional argumentation," a way of employing if-then statements to argue a point, lets you acknowledge a point without agreeing to it - a line of argument that pairs…
The Art of Debate
THE ART OF DEBATE offers you the ultimate how-to guide for hashing out differences of opinion and making stronger arguments based on reason and compromise. In 24 stimulating lectures, Professor Jarrod Atchison of Wake Forest University helps you develop your command of logic, construct clear arguments, recognize the fallacies in…
Winning the Cocktail Party
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Formal debates have clear structures, but we often debate ideas in informal settings - unpredictable, complicated, ambiguous conversations with blurred lines between judges and participants. Conclude your course with a few handy tips for how to win a debate at a cocktail party - and when to bow out of…
Asking and Answering Leading Questions
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Continue your study of cross-examinations with a detailed look at "leading questions." Useful for identifying holes in an argument, leading questions also represent persuasive arguments in and of themselves. Learn the rules of creating a good leading question and how they can help you win the debate.
The Hidden Value of Debate
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Find out what we mean when we talk about "debates," and how immersing yourself in the techniques of formal debate can have a dramatic impact on how you make decisions in every aspect of your life. From the business world to the bar room, the process of exchanging ideas will…
The Do’s and Don’ts of Serving Warrants
Part of the Series: Special Issues
It can be the law enforcement officer's most dangerous task. This 11-minute video hits the major points of how to prepare for serving the warrant, and executing it. It's a bargain at our price. Issues Addressed: Warrant Service
Building Affirmative Cases
Part of the Series: The Art of Debate
Now that you know how to develop a strong affirmative argument, apply your skills to a specific debate. Taking a resolution about campus carry laws as an example, Professor Atchison walks you through each of the steps to indict the status quo and offer a tenable solution to the problem.