Delivering the Goods
Part of the Series: Rx for Survival

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Global Travel, War, and Natural Disasters
Witness the toll infectious diseases take on populations during times of war and natural disasters, using examples from Napoleon's armies to modern-day Syria. Then, learn why your personal physician isn't the best person to talk to about risks when you're about to embark on foreign travel.
An Introduction to Infectious Diseases Series
Infectious diseases affect everyone. They account for 26% of all deaths worldwide, and unlike chronic diseases, they have the potential for explosive global impacts. In An Introduction to Infectious Diseases, get an accessible overview of diseases--from the mundane to the fatal--from a renowned physician who specializes in this topic. This…
Six Decades of Infectious Disease Challenges
Track the history of infectious diseases decade by decade: the easily cured childhood illnesses of the 50s, the diseases spread by risky behaviors in the 60s, and the outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease in the late 70s, followed by the tragedies of human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, in the 80s and…
Zoonosis: Germs Leap from Animals to Humans
Seventy percent of infectious diseases originate from wildlife. Why are new diseases--such as bird flu and swine flu--so prevalent, and how are these exotic diseases being transmitted from animals to humans? Learn how to protect yourself from these diseases, including two you can get from your cat.
Deadly Messengers
Part of the Series: Rx for Survival
Since the plague killed millions of Europeans in the Middle Ages, vector-borne diseases -- those that rely on insects and animals to spread infectious agents -- have posed a serious threat to public health. Today, the most dangerous vector on earth is the mosquito. From malaria to yellow fever to…
The Dynamic World of Infectious Disease
Dive into the fascinating stories behind three notorious diseases: bubonic plague, malaria, and polio. See how scientists of the time were able to discover the causes of these diseases and develop effective treatments. Also, learn why infectious diseases are still a pressing issue for our society, despite our advances in…
The Immune System: Our Great Protector
Take a closer look at the intricate components of your body that try to protect you from dangerous infectious diseases. Then, explore immunosenescence--the changes in your immune system as you age--and learn proven ways to keep your immune system strong and prevent illness.
Outbreak! Contagion! The Next Pandemic!
Using your newly acquired infectious disease knowledge, look into the future and discern what the next pandemic might be--one that would reach all continents quickly, be difficult to treat, be extremely deadly, and perhaps threaten the very survival of the human race!
Malaria and Tuberculosis: Global Killers
In spite of a multitude of global efforts to decrease their mortality rates, these two ancient diseases are still the deadliest in the world. Go beyond vaccines and mosquito netting and see the innovative experiments being conducted in an attempt to eradicate malaria and tuberculosis.
Influenza: Past and Future Threat
Despite being a common disease, the flu is responsible for some of the deadliest pandemics of all time. Explore two important biological aspects of influenza--antigenic drift and antigenic shift--to understand why changes in viruses can have such a huge impact on disease prevalence.
Body Wars - The Epidemic of Autoimmune Diseases.
Something frightening is happening to the citizens of the developed world. Despite major advances in health care, over recent decades we've been battling an ever-growing epidemic of once rare allergic and autoimmune diseases. Today, more than 17 million people in the U.S. alone struggle to maintain one of their body's…
Plagued: Invisible Armies
Part of the Series: Plagued
Invisible Armies: Filmed in the UK, Australia, Iceland, Hawaii and the USA, this episode looks at the interaction between our immune system and history. It draws the map of the world according to disease history and helps explain why Africa is still black. Jamaica has become black and Australia and…