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Maybe the New Wave's most anarchic entry, Vera Chytilova's absurdist farce follows the misadventures of two brash young women. Believing the world to be "spoiled," they embark on a series of pranks in which nothing--food, clothes, men, war--is taken seriously. Daisies is an aesthetically and politically adventurous film that's widely…
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One public housing flat in Moscow stood out above all others: the home of George Costakis, the foremost collector of early 20th century Russian avant-garde art. Its walls were crowded with banned and forgotten works by artists such as Malevich, Tatlin, Kandinsky, Chagall, Lissitzky, Rodchenko, and Kliun; public figures such…
Canadian Institute for Exploratory Cinemas Collection
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Japan's establishment as an economic superpower led to a Golden Age of Japanese architecture. Six innovators stand out particularly, fusing Japanese traditions with modern materials and technology.
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Optical Sound Films collects the ongoing work and research of Guy Sherwin, one of the pre-eminent British film artists of the last 40 years in a unique artist's films. Guy Sherwin studied painting at Chelsea School of Art in the 1960s before becoming closely associated with the British avant garde…
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