First- & Second-Declension Pronouns
Episode 8 of Greek 101

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Episode 28 of Greek 101
In the next four lessons, return to the declension of adjectives and pronouns to explore variations on patterns you have already practiced. In this lesson, focus on third-declension adjectives. Close by reading lines 64-69 of the Iliad. Also learn about a handy class of words called particles.
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Direct Object Pronouns and Adverbs
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Adjective Forms & Second-Declension Nouns
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So far, you have studied first-declension nouns, which are mainly feminine. Now expand your range into masculine and neuter nouns, many of which use second-declension endings. Practice these endings together with their adjectival forms in words that you will encounter in Homer.
Demonstrative Adjectives & Pronouns
Episode 29 of Greek 101
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First-Declension Masculine Nouns
Episode 11 of Greek 101
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First-Declension Nouns
Episode 2 of Greek 101
Discover that Greek nouns have gender and their endings supply a host of information, such as whether the case is nominative, genitive, dative, or accusative--a function usually performed by word order or prepositions in English. Begin with the eight noun endings of the primarily feminine first declension.
Indirect Object Pronouns
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Additional Patterns of the First Declension
Episode 4 of Greek 101
Look at two variations in the pattern of the first declension--one used in Homeric Greek and the other in Koine, the Greek of the New Testament. Despite being separated by almost a thousand years, the two dialects have remarkable continuity.
Relative, Interrogative & Indefinite Pronouns
Episode 31 of Greek 101
Conclude your exploration of Greek pronouns with interrogative, indefinite, and relative pronouns. These are words such as who, which, and what; and, for indefinite pronouns, someone, something, and similar unspecific descriptors. Look at examples in the New Testament and in the Iliad 81-85.