Harakiri

Janus Films
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Comments (2)

Traci avatar
Traci

This is one of my favorite films. The perfect example of bushido. It broke my heart and made me love it still.

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Kevin

If you liked Rashomon, watch this. Kobayashi is an underappreciated master, and this is his best work.

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