The Immigrant
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies

Flicker Alley
Show More

Comments (1)

Anna avatar
Anna

A silent romantic short comedy that remains so relevant to the immigrant experience in America today.

Related videos

Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 1
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay find Chaplin further experimenting with new cinematic techniques, while continuing…
Chaplin's Mutual Comedies - A Collection of Chaplin's Finest Work
In the comedies Charlie Chaplin created for the Mutual Film Corporation, Chaplin sometimes played an inebriate, a fireman, or a prop man in a movie studio; but most of all, he further explored and developed his celebrated Little Tramp character that would soon join Falstaff and Don Quixote in the…
The Adventurer
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The most popular of the Mutuals, The Adventurer begins and ends with a chase. It is the fastest-paced film of the series, and although it has more slapstick than Easy Street and The Immigrant, it is redeemed by its construction, characterization, and Chaplin's balletic grace.
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 3
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay find Chaplin further experimenting with new cinematic techniques, while continuing…
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 2
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay find Chaplin further experimenting with new cinematic techniques, while continuing…
Laughing Like We Used To
Seven comedies, including four restored from turn of the century Italy and France, a recently-discovered nitrate negative of Charlie Chaplin's first appearance in his "tramp" attire, a frenetic Mack Sennett "gag fest" replete with tin lizzies, and The Pest (1922), starring a pre-Hardy Stan Laurel.
Flirting With Fate
A Douglas Fairbanks film apart of the collection, Douglas Fairbanks: A Modern Musketeer which includes eleven of the joyful modern-dress comedies, westerns, satires, dream-fantasies and romances which, though mostly seldom-seen, made Fairbanks a tremendously popular hero. In addition to Fairbanks's unique talent, these ebullient films showcase his gifted collaborators including…
Mack Sennett Collection Volume One
The Keystone Film Company, under the guidance of pioneering producer and director Mack Sennett, was the birthplace of classic American slapstick comedy. This historic studio was at one time home to a staggering number of silent screen luminaries including Mabel Normand, Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, Harold Lloyd, Gloria Swanson, Wallace Beery,…
Chaplin at Keystone
Charles Chaplin came to Mack Sennett's Keystone Studios late in 1913 as a little-known British vaudevillian, and after a year, had not only established his Tramp character, learned to write and direct his own films, and also achieved public recognition as a star comedian. Although Keystone did not publicize its…
The Marriage Circle
The tone is set from the opening scene as legendary director Ernst Lubitsch effortlessly sets up the duality of one perfectly happy marriage contrasted with another couple in a perpetual state of grimly endured misalliance. The Marriage Circle is full of scenes with a sense of unspoken formality, of a…
Bed and Sofa (And Chess Fever)
Daring for its time - or any time - Bed And Sofa is the story of a love triangle between a woman and two men living together in a one-room basement apartment in 1927 Moscow. When Liuda becomes pregnant and no one knows which man is the father, she must…
The Best Arbuckle/Keaton Collection Volume Two
From 1913 to 1916, Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle rose from the ranks of bit player to writer, director and star of comedies for Mack Sennett's Keystone Film Company. Because of Sennett's belief that actors were interchangeable, he lost Arbuckle to producer Joseph M. Schenck, who not only paid the comedian handsomely,…