The Immigrant
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies

Flicker Alley
Show More

Comments (1)

Anna avatar
Anna

A silent romantic short comedy that remains so relevant to the immigrant experience in America today.

Related videos

Behind the Screen
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
A refinement of his earlier comedies set in a film studio, Behind the Screen, Chaplin's seventh film for Mutual, lampoons the unmotivated slapstick of the kind Chaplin disliked when he worked for Mack Sennett. Chaplin made the film as a sort of parody of the knockabout, pie-throwing comedy of the…
Chaplin's Mutual Comedies - A Collection of Chaplin's Finest Work
In the comedies Charlie Chaplin created for the Mutual Film Corporation, Chaplin sometimes played an inebriate, a fireman, or a prop man in a movie studio; but most of all, he further explored and developed his celebrated Little Tramp character that would soon join Falstaff and Don Quixote in the…
The Rink
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
Chaplin's eighth film for Mutual, The Rink, is one of his most popular comedies. Charlie is an inept waiter who prepares the bill of Mr. Stout (Eric Campbell) by examining the soup, spaghetti, melon stains and other remnants on the sloppy eater's shirt front, tie, and ear.
Douglas Fairbanks: A Modern Musketeer - A Collection of Eleven Modern Films
Winner of 2009 Il Cinema Ritrovato DVD Awards, Douglas Fairbanks: A Modern Musketeer includes eleven of the joyful modern-dress comedies, westerns, satires, dream-fantasies and romances which, though mostly seldom-seen, made Fairbanks a tremendously popular hero. In addition to Fairbanks's unique talent, these ebullient films showcase his gifted collaborators including writer…
The Adventurer
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The most popular of the Mutuals, The Adventurer begins and ends with a chase. It is the fastest-paced film of the series, and although it has more slapstick than Easy Street and The Immigrant, it is redeemed by its construction, characterization, and Chaplin's balletic grace.
The Vagabond
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The Vagabond, Chaplin's third Mutual film, was an important step in Chaplin's career, in which he interweaves pathos as an integral part of the comedy. He imposed an unlikely happy ending on The Vagabond, in which the gypsy drudge demands that the car she is being taken away be turned…
The Mystery of the Leaping Fish
A Douglas Fairbanks film apart of the collection, Douglas Fairbanks: A Modern Musketeer which includes eleven of the joyful modern-dress comedies, westerns, satires, dream-fantasies and romances which, though mostly seldom-seen, made Fairbanks a tremendously popular hero. In addition to Fairbanks's unique talent, these ebullient films showcase his gifted collaborators including…
Flirting With Fate
A Douglas Fairbanks film apart of the collection, Douglas Fairbanks: A Modern Musketeer which includes eleven of the joyful modern-dress comedies, westerns, satires, dream-fantasies and romances which, though mostly seldom-seen, made Fairbanks a tremendously popular hero. In addition to Fairbanks's unique talent, these ebullient films showcase his gifted collaborators including…
Easy Street
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
Easy Street, his ninth film for Mutual and the most famous of the twelve, Chaplin ordered the first of the T-shaped street sets to be built that he would consistently utilize to provide a perfect backdrop to his comedy. The look and feel of Easy Street evoke the South London…
The Pawnshop
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
In the sixth Mutual film, Charlie is a pawnbroker's assistant in a pawnshop that evokes the London of Chaplin's childhood. The film is rich in comic transposition, a key element to Chaplin's genius. The apex of such work in the Mutuals is the celebrated scene in The Pawnshop in which…
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 1
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay find Chaplin further experimenting with new cinematic techniques, while continuing…
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 2
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay find Chaplin further experimenting with new cinematic techniques, while continuing…