The Last Metro

Criterion Collection/Janus Films
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Alex

This film is a true classic in my opinion. I would like to know if this is based on a true story. Even though it's set in Nazi occupied France, the film is heart warming, humorous, and not as depressing compared to other films with Jewish persecution themes. The film showed great attention to ...Read more

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