Late Spring

Criterion Collection/Janus Films
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Anonymous

I liked it, but it was very dated. Think of it as a Japanese precursor to Wes Anderson but with a significant amount of realism

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Anonymous

Wes Anderson has gotten away with ripping off Ozu, Kaurismaki, Bergman, Bresson, Herzog, Buñuel, Ray, Kieslowski, Fassbinder, Antonioni, Godard, Wenders, Jarmusch, Fellini, and countless others for decades.
Audiences are kept ill-informed of his creative process of (1) digesting the ...Read more

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