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Part of the Series: America by the Numbers

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Politics of the New South
Part of the Series: America by the Numbers
Anchor Maria Hinojosa returns to Clarkston, Georgia, home to more than 40 different nationalities, to document its November 2013 city council and mayoral election -- with three former refugees on the ballot. These candidates, many from war-torn countries, are exercising voting rights and actively engaging in democracy as political candidates…
KKK - The Fight for White Supremacy
BBC
America's most infamous supremacist group - the Ku Klux Klan - says they are in the midst of a revival, with a surge in membership and cross burnings across the Deep South. Film-maker Dan Murdoch meets the leaders of the Loyal White Knights, who claim to be the largest Klan…
Mr. Civil Rights - Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP
PBS
Civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall's triumph in the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision to desegregate America's public schools completed the final leg of an heroic journey to end legal segregation. For 20 years, during wartime and the Depression, Marshall had traveled hundreds of thousands of miles…
Power and Terror - Noam Chomsky in Our Times
"Everyone's worried about stopping terrorism. Well, there's a really easy way: Stop participating in it." - Noam Chomsky Power and Terror: Noam Chomsky in our Times gives the public a rare opportunity to see and listen to one of the most articulate, committed and hard-working political dissidents of our time,…
Our Private Idaho
Part of the Series: America by the Numbers
American suburbs are becoming more diverse, but the "exurbs" that surround them remain overwhelmingly white. In fact, while whites account for only eight percent of total U.S. population growth, they make up 73 percent of growth in exurban areas. Visit Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, a town that successfully ousted the Aryan…
How Racism Harms White Americans
A lecture by John H. Bracey Distinguished historian John H. Bracey Jr. offers a provocative analysis of the devastating economic, political, and social effects of racism on white Americans. In a departure from analyses of racism that have focused primarily on white power and privilege, Bracey trains his focus on…
Brown Bread - The Story of an Adoptive Family
In the hills of Northern California, an unusual family gathers for their reunion. As they join hands around the table, their colorful mix of races looks like the American dream of integration. Black, white, middle class, ghetto: adoption gave the same name to six children from very different backgrounds. Scenes…
The Age of Slavery - 1800-1860
Part of the Series: The African Americans
What made cotton so desirable? In the 1790s Americas oldest crops, like tobacco, were depleting farmland and dropping in value. At the same time, the textile industry in Great Britain was exploding, creating enormous international demand for cotton clothing. Eli Whitney's invention of the cotton gin, which easily separated cotton…
Accidental Courtesy - Musician Daryl Davis Meets and Befriends Members of the Ku Klux Klan
Musician Daryl likes to meet and befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan- something few black men can say. In his travels, he's collected robes and other artifacts from friends affiliated with the Klan, building a collection piece by piece, story by story, and person by person in hopes of…
Separate and Unequal
Part of the Series: Frontline
Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared separate schools for black and white children unconstitutional, school segregation is making a comeback. What's behind the growing racial divide in American schools -- and what's the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education? In part two, Omarina's Story, FRONTLINE revisits a student…
Into the Fire - 1861-1896
Part of the Series: The African Americans
Into the Fire examines the most tumultuous and consequential period in African American history: the Civil War and the end of slavery, and Reconstruction's thrilling but tragically brief "moment in the sun." From the beginning, African Americans were agents of their own liberation, forcing the Union to confront the issue…
Neighbors: Conservation in a Changing Community
When filmmaker, Richard Rogers and producer, Janet Mendelsohn were funded by the National Endowment for the Arts to make a film about the growing interest in neighborhood conservation, they chose Boston's South End -- an ethnically and economically diverse community that, like many other American cities at the time, had…