Protecting Yourself in Cyberspace

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The Incredible Scope of Cyberspace
What makes the Internet so vulnerable is its ability to connect, and to be connected to, anyone and almost anything. Here, explore how cyberspace works. You'll learn what goes on behind the scenes of a simple Internet search, how a simple TCP/IP system functions, the five layers of connections that…
Government Regulation of Cyberspace
Join the debate about government regulation of cyberspace with this episode that considers both sides of the issue. By looking at the debate in America over government oversight of cybersecurity (and whether we even need it at all), you'll be better informed about a topic that has serious ramifications for…
Listening In and Going Dark
Learn how encryption and wiretapping work in cyberspace, and how both methods are becoming increasingly frustrating for law enforcement and national security officials. This "going dark" phenomenon, as you'll find in this eye-opening discussion, brings benefits and causes problems--and the solutions seem to bring problems of their own.
Cyber Fraud, Theft, and Organized Crime
Professor Rosenzweig leads you on an examination of all-too-common instances of cybercrime that involve fraud and identity theft. You'll encounter crimes that mimic real-world ones (with a computer as the "weapon") and "computer crimes" that are only possible in the cyber world. Then, find out how law enforcement authorities are…
Stuxnet—The First Cyber Guided Missile
Your introduction to the fascinating--and fascinatingly dangerous--world of cybersecurity begins with the story of "Stuxnet." Learn how this unique piece of malware, which shut down a uranium enrichment facility in Iran, signaled the dawn of a new age in which viruses and other cyber threats can manipulate the physical world.
Nations at Cyber War
Turn now to the highest level of cyber conflict: a cyber war between nation-states. What is meant by the term "cyber war"? How does one fight a battle in cyberspace? What do the enemies look like? Do traditional international rules of armed conflict apply? How do we counter such an…
The Devil in the Chips—Hardware Failures
Hardware-based threats are one of the most vexing problems in the entire cybersecurity domain. How do we know that our machines will actually do what we tell them to do? Why is compromised hardware such a critical threat to cybersecurity? What are some possible solutions for dangers hidden in computer…
International Governance and the Internet
Continue exploring rules and regulations about the Internet, this time on the international level. First, Professor Rosenzweig discusses existing Internet governance and the dynamics leading to change. Then, he assesses some of the barriers to effective international governance of the Internet. Is the current structure, with all of its flaws,…
Hacktivists and Insurgency
Enter the netherworld of hacktivism, or the use of computer hacking methods to stage protests and make political statements. In this episode, learn to identify and distinguish the "good guys" from the "bad guys" by exploring real-world examples that illustrate the three major types of hacktivists: political activists, cyber insurgents,…
The Problem of Identity on the Network
Identification is perhaps the single most profound challenge for cybersecurity today. In this episode, delve into the question of network anonymity and identity. Who maintains domain names? How can people obscure their identities for malicious purposes? How are network designers fighting back against this threat? What are the ethical problems…
Of Viruses, Botnets, and Logic Bombs
Learn about some of the most dangerous ways people can exploit the Internet's vulnerabilities, including DDoS attacks (which flood websites with connection requests), "Trojans" (malware hidden inside an innocent piece of information), and "botnets" (which control computers like puppets). Then, investigate some common defense mechanisms that help pinpoint and capture…
The Constitution and Cyberspace
Return to American policies on cybersecurity, this time focusing on the idea of government monitoring of the Internet. Start by learning all about how on-network monitoring systems work. After that, step back and examine how government monitoring is enforced and limited--but not prohibited--by the Constitution.