Quantitative Reasoning in Everyday Life

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Extend your understanding of molarity by solving some typical problems encountered in the high school chemistry classroom. To foster your understanding of these problems, you are asked to draw upon the quantitative reasoning skills you previously used.
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Building on the ideas explored in the first three lectures, you examine a fundamental quantitative measurement in chemistry, density, and explore the real-world meaning of this measurement. You then solidify your understanding of this concept by working some basic density problems.
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You are asked to take the concepts you learned about molarity in the last two lectures and apply them to a number of unfamiliar problems. These problems offer an opportunity to test your comprehension of the concepts you've been exploring.
An Introduction to Equilibrium Problems
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Look at weak acids and bases, compounds that are only slightly ionized in water-based solutions. You learn how to solve the "classic" weak acid problem and apply the same approach to weak base problems.