Salt for Svanetia
Part of the Series: Landmarks of Early Soviet Film

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Landmarks of Early Soviet Film - 8 Groundbreaking Films (1924 - 1930)
This groundbreaking collection features eight seminal films from the Soviet silent era. Sergei M. Eisenstein's last silent and seldom seen Old and New (1929); Dziga Vertov's Stride, Soviet (1926); Victor Turin's Turksib (1930); Esther Shub's The Fall of the Romanov Dynasty (1927); Boris Barnet's The House on Trubnaya (1928); Lev…
The Childhood of Maxim Gorky
An immortality that Soviet Russia has heretofore allotted only to Lenin and Marx is bestowed upon the country's greatest writer, Maxim Gorky. One of the noblest achievements of pre-war Soviet cinema,O (Jay Leyda, Kino), this haunting, unforgettable film is based upon Maxim Gorky's 1913 autobiography My Childhood and shows a…
J'Accuse
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The Life and Passion of Jesus Christ with From The Manger to The Cross
La Vie et la passion de Jesus-Christ was begun in 1902 by Ferdinand Zecca (1864-1947) for Pathe Freres in Paris, then the most important film company in the world. Zecca made 18 carefully costumed and staged tableaux against painted backdrops which are clearly influenced by the famous Biblical woodcuts of…
Joan the Woman
Joan the Woman (Cardinal Film Corporation, 1916) was Cecil B. DeMille's first great spectacle. In keeping with theatrical tradition, DeMille sought a more formal and stylized mode of acting from stars Geraldine Farrar and Wallace Reid - a technique he continued in his late historical films. Wilfred Buckland's art direction…
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The Hunchback of Notre Dame
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The Marriage Circle
The tone is set from the opening scene as legendary director Ernst Lubitsch effortlessly sets up the duality of one perfectly happy marriage contrasted with another couple in a perpetual state of grimly endured misalliance. The Marriage Circle is full of scenes with a sense of unspoken formality, of a…
Miss Mend
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Georges Melies: First Wizard of Cinema Volume Five
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Stride, Soviet!
Part of the Series: Landmarks of Early Soviet Film
STRIDE, SOVIET! is a film intended to publicize, in the run-up to local elections, the work and accomplishments of the Moscow municipal council or "soviet." Dziga Vertov attempts a different kind of lecture film, one that disposes of staid commentary in favor of sharp visual conflicts that mimic the impact…
Turksib
Part of the Series: Landmarks of Early Soviet Film
TURKSIB set itself the modest goal of educating the Soviet public about the need for a railroad connecting Siberia and Turkestan. Although the film was released before construction of the railroad was completed, which would not be until 1931, the dynamic finale of the locomotive reaching the nomads reenacts a…