When the Bough Breaks
Part of the Series: Unnatural Causes

California Newsreel
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Comments (48)

Anonymous picture
Raegan

I found this video extremely interesting because I never realized some of the things it pointed out. I never thought racism could of affected a baby that isn't eve born but it does make sense after watching this video. I also never realized some of the factors that also contributed like ...Read more

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Rochelle

As a person who was born premature with a low birth weight, I found this video to really hit home to me. I hate that racism still exists and that it is affecting African American women and their unborn children.

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Aleksei

This video actually shocked me. It is horrible that racism alone has harmed some of the African American women and children in our society. This new perspective has been hard for me to comprehend; I did not think racism was so prevalent as to cause harm to members of our society.

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Scott

I may be in the minority, but this film didn't seem to be as much about race as the fact that when immigrants come to America their health is negatively affected. I found it interesting that after one generation African American women have smaller babies. Even when learning about the laywer ...Read more

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Alayna

It is appalling, but not shocking the affects that racism has on individual's health, and even more so on the health of a fetus. This video makes me want to look more into how to address racism and dismantle the physical and social structures that uphold it, and how to implement it into ...Read more

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Eric

It was crazy to me that here in one of the most developed countries in the world that we are ranking so poorly in the number of infants that reach age 1.
it is an interesting theory that should be further investigated that racism could be the cause of this.

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Jordan

Although we have come a long way with racism, it is still very much so a thing unfortunately. I can definitely see how racism could cause so much stress for some people. To me, it is interesting that racism can cause preterm/underweight births.

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Kristen

This video really blew me away as I never would have expected racism to affect how early a child might be born and what their birth weight will be. We all know that stress can affect a woman's pregnancy, but I don't think we think about the stress they experience way before they even get ...Read more

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Justin

Racism in the world today still amazes me and I though as a society we would have outgrown that. There is no reason that well educated African American women should have worse pregnancy outcomes then a white woman who has not even finished high school.

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Tori

I knew that racism can cause a lot of stress for people, but I never knew it could cause problems for a persons future unborn baby. It is sad to see the amount of racism that is still going on today.

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Jeanna

I think that the on going problems with racism are mind blowing. It is crazy to me that the levels of racism put on African American women can cause their children to having health issues when they are born. An African American woman who eats well, exercises, has good prenatal care, and a ...Read more

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Hayley

It really blows my mind that racism is still a problem in today's world and knowing that racism impacts a baby's life makes myself very sad. Every baby should get a chance to live the healthiest life possible. These babies are born into the world having no idea what racism is and they are ...Read more

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Lydia

This video is absolutely heartbreaking. I had no idea that African American babies were suffering from racism before they even know what racism is. It's almost baffling to see the vast difference in infant mortality rates between white and black mothers despite them having the same education, ...Read more

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Richard

Of all the videos in this series, I think this impacted me the most. Racism is a terrible facet of our society, and it is undeniable that it still influences peoples' actions, but I never would have guessed it even affects the unborn and their future health. How can we overcome this?

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Anna

The thing that I found most surprising about this was to learn that it is not just the stress a mother experiences while pregnant that can affect birth outcomes but the stress she has experienced throughout her entire life.

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Taylor

This surprised me so much because I wouldn't think your race would have any factor in whether your baby came early or not. Even if you are a African american women your baby can still come early regardless of your wealth or health. It's sad that racism still occurs today and unborn children ...Read more

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Tina

It is interesting to me that the stress that a woman deals with in her lifetime even before she becomes pregnant can affect the infants health.

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Allison

I was surprised to learn that premature babies are at an increased risk for chronic factors later down the road such as diabetes and hypertension. I was born 2.5 months early so I found this video extremely interesting, but also heart breaking.

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Clayton

An interesting video with an interesting perspective. I'd love to see more research however, or perhaps go more in depth with the given research. Overall, it is a very interesting issue and hopefully research has continued on the subject.

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Jelena

I found it very concerning that a baby is more likely to live until the age of one in countries like Slovenia, Cyprus, Israel, and Croatia compared to the United States. Considering America is equipped with such great healthcare, I found this to be an alarming statistic.

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jensen

It saddens me that racism is still going on, and is strong enough to effect a persons health and their child's. Racism is like a disease and when it is internalized for so long it can have tremendous effects on a person, more so a woman, and even her child's health. When the body is trying to ...Read more

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Melinda

I never would have thought being raised in a stressed environment (discrimination) could affect pregnant women years later. The stress impacts the babies and their health even if the mother is no longer stressed years later.

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Dymon

It was unbelievable to me that stress alone from discrimination can cause birth weight in babies delivered from black women. Those stress hormones can cause the body to go in premature delivery. This can affect the baby by increase risk of diabetes and hypertension. It is sad to see that ...Read more

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Carole

Very thought provoking and interesting video. I'd love to see research into this go further.
I'm curious to compare numbers between perceived chronic stress across groups and compare premature and low birthweight number, compare other minority groups, and compare whites living as ...Read more

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Krisha

Definitely an eye opener to see the affects of discrimination on health status and mortality rates.

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Trinaty

This one is much harder for me to jump on board with. I agree that those really experiencing the stress of racial inequalities could have these outcomes. However the woman followed for this video was successful and it is just hard for me to see the connections. It could because I come from a ...Read more

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Carson

This is a really eye turning video to show that racism doesn't just affect the person receiving the negative comments and looks. I previously did not know this and now that I do I think it is crazy. Good video though.

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Brittny

This video was definitely an eye opening one for me. I am shocked at Americas infant mortality rate as a whole. The fact that the stress of race makes those numbers so much worse for African American women is shocking to me. This is not a stress factor I would have considered and I hope as a ...Read more

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Sarah

I watched this video in a previous class. This is a great video to show that race still plays a role in society and our health. It's crazy to think that an African American woman who has been to college actually has worse health outcomes for their child than a Caucasian woman who didn't even ...Read more

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Suzan

This is an eyeopening and a shocking information at the same time because i have never thought that discrimination can have that much of an impact on babies and their health. however, it makes a lot of sense since discrimination causes a lot of stress and that affects the infants.

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Shaquayla

This video was actually an eye opener for myself. Before watching, I was unaware that African American women were at the highest risk for premature births. I find it unfortunate that racism takes a major toll on the infant before even being born into the world. Even though higher education is ...Read more

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Fatima

Even though stress can have a huge impact on an individual, there is still so much more that can cause health problems. I would have never thought that racism would come back and continue to have an impact on someones life and then the life of their unborn children. This is high in african ...Read more

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Allysen

African American women in the US, regardless of social factors such as greater income and higher education still have higher rates of chronic disease and poor birth outcomes. The accumulation of stressors due to race will also affect the quality of life for generations there after thus ...Read more

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Kelli

This video was probably one of the more startling videos out of the series. Though it isn't surprising to learn that racism and discrimination affect the health of the men and women who experience its oppression, it affects the children/fetuses of these communities. In our culture, we focus ...Read more

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Waseem

Wow. I was little shocked during the video learning that racism can have such a big effect on something that hasn't even come in this world yet. Very informative video.

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Marissa

I found this video to be extremely eyeopening and educational. I have never heard nor learned about the correlation between racism and premature birth rates. Such an interesting video.

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Tressa

I had no idea how much stress discrimination could have on a persons health. Discrimination is a terrible thing and this video really shows what all it can do to a person. Especially pregnant women. I had no idea racism could have such an effect on a fetus. It's very eyeopening and can really ...Read more

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Hannah

This is incredible. I was so blind to the lasting effects of discrimination on a population. My question is, what can we (as a Nation) do to begin the reduction of low birth weights and early births for African-American Women?

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Breea

I found this video very interesting because I never would of thought of a correlation between premature births and racism.

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Brittany

According to the video, yes, racism seems to somewhat affect birth outcomes between White and African Americans. Premature births happen so often, but I never related them to this issue. This is an interesting, eye opening clip.

Just a reminder that racism is real in our world.

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Sierra

I found this video crazy because I never thought that something such as racism could lead to premature births. It also makes me very sad and angry that just because someone is white they are picked over the African-American that had better education and resumes.

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Ashliee

African American’s in American society is causing dangerously low birth weights of African American babies. This was never heard of years ago, racism as a risk factor of health was not even thought of! This was such a learning experience!

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Courtney

I did not realize that African American women have 3x the amount of premature births as white women. The study between African women, white women born in the US, and African women born in the US was eye opening, stating that Africans born in America have babies that weigh 8-9 ounces less ...Read more

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alexandrea

It is very hard to believe that African Americans tend to have more premature babies even though they tend to follow healthy lifestyles and doing as told by their doctors while pregnant.

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Shana

This video truly depicts the affects that racism has on health. The stressors that it brings create a lifetime of health issues and those health issues also affect children. African American women are having premature and low birth weight babies due to the effects of dealing with racism. It ...Read more

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Kori

I also thought this video was really hard to watch. I do not understand how the infant mortality rate for African-American babies can be so much higher, especially when the average rate in America is already ridiculous.

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Megan

This video was extremely hard for me to watch. It has hit very close to home within the last couple of weeks. I don't expect everyone to understand that unless they have dealt with loss and racism. I can say, however, that I fully support the research going into this study. The stress for ...Read more

Anonymous picture
Amelia

I would think a much much more likely scenario for the worse birth outcomes would be poor health, nutrition, and stress experienced by the generation or two that came before Kim Anderson rather than the stress she experienced in her lifetime which doesn't seem to be all that high considering. ...Read more

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