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The Battle of Algiers
Part of the Series: Criterion Favorites Collection
One of the most influential political films in history, The Battle of Algiers, by Gillo Pontecorvo, vividly re-creates a key year in the tumultuous Algerian struggle for independence from the occupying French in the 1950s. As violence escalates on both…
La Haine
Mathieu Kassovitz took the film world by storm with La haine, a gritty, unsettling, and visually explosive look at the racial and cultural volatility in modern-day France, specifically the low-income banlieue districts on Paris's outskirts. Aimlessly passing their days in…
Breathless
Part of the Series: Criterion French New Wave Collection
There was before Breathless, and there was after Breathless. Jean-Luc Godard burst onto the film scene in 1960 with this jazzy, free-form, and sexy homage to the American film genres that inspired him as a writer for Cahiers du cinema.…
Cleo From 5 to 7
Part of the Series: Criterion French New Wave Collection
Agnes Varda eloquently captures Paris in the sixties with this real-time portrait of a singer (Corinne Marchand) set adrift in the city as she awaits test results of a biopsy. A chronicle of the minutes of one woman's life, Cleo…
The 400 Blows
Part of the Series: Criterion French New Wave Collection
Francois Truffaut's first feature is also his most personal. Told through the eyes of Truffaut's cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Leaud),The 400 Blows sensitively re-creates the trials of Truffaut's own childhood, unsentimentally portraying aloof parents, oppressive teachers, and petty crime.…
Weekend
Part of the Series: Criterion French New Wave Collection
This scathing late-sixties satire from Jean-Luc Godard is one of cinema's great anarchic works. Determined to collect an inheritance from a dying relative, a bourgeois couple travel across the French countryside while civilization crashes and burns around them. Featuring a…
F for Fake
Part of the Series: Criterion World Documentaries Collection
Trickery. Deceit. Magic. In Orson Welles's free-form documentary F for Fake, the legendary filmmaker (and self-described charlatan) gleefully engages the central preoccupation of his career--the tenuous line between truth and illusion, art and lies. Beginning with portraits of world-renowned art…
Au revoir les enfants
Part of the Series: Criterion Art Cinema of the 1980s & 1990s Collection
Au revoir les enfants tells a heartbreaking story of friendship and devastating loss concerning two boys living in Nazi-occupied France. At a provincial Catholic boarding school, the precocious youths enjoy true camaraderie--until a secret is revealed. Based on events from…
Night and Fog
Part of the Series: Criterion World Documentaries Collection
Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, filmmaker Alain Resnais documented the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz. One of the first cinematic reflections on the horrors of the Holocaust, Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard) contrasts the stillness…
Faat Kine
Part of the Series: The Library of African Cinema
In Faat Kine, Ousmane Sembene, the unquestioned father of African cinema, calls his fellow Africans to a reckoning of the post-independence era at the beginning of a new century. At 77, he sums up 40 years of path-breaking filmmaking with…
Sans Soleil
Chris Marker, filmmaker, poet, novelist, photographer, editor, and now videographer and digital multimedia artist, has been challenging moviegoers, philosophers, and himself for years with his complex queries about time, memory, and the rapid advancement of life on this planet. Sans…
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Umbrellas of Cherbourg
An angelically beautiful Catherine Deneuve was launched to stardom by this dazzling musical heart-tugger from Jacques Demy. She plays an umbrella-shop owner's delicate daughter, glowing with first love for a handsome garage mechanic, played by Nino Castelnuovo. When the boy…
Vivre sa vie
Part of the Series: Criterion French New Wave Collection
Vivre sa vie was a turning point for Jean-Luc Godard and remains one of his most dynamic films, combining brilliant visual design with a tragic character study. The lovely Anna Karina, Godard's greatest muse, plays Nana, a young Parisian who…
Jules and Jim
Part of the Series: Criterion French New Wave Collection
Hailed as one of the finest films ever made, Jules and Jim charts, over twenty-five years, the relationship between two friends and the object of their mutual obsession. The legendary Francois Truffaut directs, and Jeanne Moreau stars as the alluring…
Monsieur Lazhar
Nominated for an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film, Monsieur Lazhar tells the poignant story of a Montreal middle school class shaken by the death of their well-liked teacher. Bachir Lazhar (Fellag), a 55-year-old Algerian immigrant, offers the school his…
Beauty and the Beast
Part of the Series: The Criterion Golden Age of French Cinema Collection Vol. 1
Jean Cocteau's sublime adaptation of Mme. Leprince de Beaumont's fairy-tale masterpiece--in which the pure love of a beautiful girl melts the heart of a feral but gentle beast--is a landmark of motion picture fantasy, with unforgettably romantic performances by Jean…
Hearts and Minds
Part of the Series: Criterion World Documentaries Collection
A courageous and startling film, Peter Davis's landmark documentary Hearts and Minds unflinchingly confronts the United States' involvement in Vietnam. Using a wealth of sources--from interviews to newsreels to documentary footage of the conflict at home and abroad--Davis constructs a…
La Jetée
Part of the Series: The Criterion Golden Age of French Cinema Collection Vol. 2
Chris Marker, filmmaker, poet, novelist, photographer, editor, and now videographer and digital multimedia artist, has been challenging moviegoers, philosophers, and himself for years with his complex queries about time, memory, and the rapid advancement of life on this planet. Marker's…
The Rules of the Game
Part of the Series: The Criterion Golden Age of French Cinema Collection Vol. 1
Considered one of the greatest films ever made, The Rules of the Game (La regle du jeu), by Jean Renoir, is a scathing critique of corrupt French society cloaked in a comedy of manners in which a weekend at a…
Playtime
Jacques Tati's gloriously choreographed, nearly wordless comedies about confusion in an age of high technology reached their apotheosis with PlayTime. For this monumental achievement, a nearly three-year-long, bank-breaking production, Tati again thrust the lovably old-fashioned Monsieur Hulot, along with a…